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English2

Intent

Our mission as educators is to enable students to become the finest readers and writers of literary texts that they can be. This is because those texts, in their boundless variety, find their focus in our fellow citizens, our histories, and our cultures and this leads us in aspiring to equip our students with the skills to read from a global perspective and reflect upon such study sensitively, creatively and with shrewd judgment and care. 

Introduction 

The English Department is dedicated to four related undertakings: surveying and evaluating the diverse range of texts in the English language; researching and teaching the rich and varied history of that language; nurturing exceptional creative, as well as critical, writing; and studying texts in relation to wider cultural expression.

We are lucky enough to have a vibrant, successful and experienced team of teaching staff who lead lessons with enthusiasm and creativity while ensuring consistently high standards and outcomes.  Our students have very positive experiences in their English lessons and feel challenged, they are confident that we always have their progress and future success in mind as we seek to foster a lifelong love of learning through the study and appreciation of language and literature. 

Examples of cross-curricular links

STEM & ICT:     non-routine problem solving, expert thinking, metacognition, decision making and reasoning 
Humanities: historical, political, cultural and social context
Performing Arts:  plays and theatre, oracy and communication skills, performance, role play and other creative expression 

 

Examples of Cultural Capital entitlement from NC

Knowledge and appreciation of a range of literary texts with a view to understanding the power and depth of the English literary heritage in a way that is inclusive and reflective.  Students explore the key themes and issues addressed in the texts studied that allows exploration, appreciation and understanding of cultural groups and concerns.  Such opportunity is borne of the choices made for close focus that includes texts from or reflective of diverse cultural, social, political and historical points of view. 

Key Stage 3: Shakespeare plays, folk tales, myth and legend, poems from other cultures, protest poetry, spoken word, the “Big Wide World” and “Face: The Play”.

Key Stage 4: “The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde”, “A Christmas Carol”, “Romeo and Juliet”, “An Inspector Calls”, poetry of “conflict”, “Beyond”, 19th Century Literature, 20th and 21st Century Non Fiction.  Further texts that offer insight and exploration of culturally significant texts have been added to the taught specification and will be considered for future study.

Key Stage 5: “Othello”, Keats poetry, “A Streetcar Named Desire”, “The Handmaid’s Tale”, “Frankenstein”, “The War of the Worlds” and Post 2000 poetry.  “Into the Wild”, Robert Browning poetry and a range of literary non-fiction texts with a thematic focus on “Paris”.

Key Stage 3

In KS3 the programme of study follows the new National Curriculum. Students are given the opportunity to learn and develop the core skills that are necessary to enable them to be successful within this key stage and build a foundation for Key Stage 4 GCSE English Language and Literature. Across the reading and writing schemes of work, students will develop culturally, emotionally, intellectually, socially and spiritually as a result of the topics addressed.

In line with the national curriculum, the English curriculum aims to ensure all students:

  • Read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • Develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • Acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • Appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • Write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • Use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • Are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate.

Reading:

The schemes of work ensure that students have the opportunity to develop an appreciation and love of reading, and read increasingly challenging material studying two Shakespearian texts (Macbeth and The Tempest,) novels such as The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck and The Woman in Black by Susan Hill.  Students will also study a diverse range of poetry and drama, such as Face (The Play) by Benjamin Zephaniah, and a range of non-fiction texts linked to themes such as Sustainability, Homelessness and The Big Wide World.  

Writing:

The schemes of work ensure that students write accurately, fluently and effectively at length with opportunities to plan, draft, edit and proof read. Students will write for different purposes and audiences with opportunities to describe, narrate, persuade, argue and advise.

Year 7

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3

Arthur Conan Doyle "Hound of the Baskervilles"

Assessed Skills: Reading

Magic and Mystery

Assessed Skills: Reading and Writing

Speeches and the Spoken Word

Assessed Skills: Reading, Writing and SLE

Term 4 Term 5 Term 6

Shakespeare: The Tempest

Assessed Skills: Reading

Non Fiction: Survival

Assessed Skills: Reading and Writing

Benjamin Zephaniah "Face"

Assessed Skills: Reading


Year 8

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3

Susan Hill "The Woman in Black"

Assessed Skills: Reading

Imaginative Writing

Assessed Skills: Writing

Myths and Legends

Assessed Skills: Reading and Writing

Transactional Writing


Assessed Skills: Writing

Term 4 Term 5 Term 6

Poetry From Other Cultures

Assessed Skills: Reading and Writing

Homelessness

Assessed Skills: Reading and Writing and Speaking

Shakespeare "Macbeth"

Assessed Skills: Reading

Year 9

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3

John Steinbeck "Of Mice and Men"

Assessed Skills: Reading

Big Wide World

Assessed Skills: Reading and Writing

Shakespeare Sonnets & Extracts

Assessed Skills: Reading
Term 4 Term 5 Term 6

Imaginative Writing

Assessed Skills: Writing

Poetry: Taking a Stand

Assessed Skills: Reading

Sustainable World

Assessed Skills: Reading and Writing and Speaking

Example of skill progression

In Key Stage 3 students will experience a broad and varied curriculum with a study focus that includes, for example, prose, written and spoken skills, poetry and Shakespeare.  Such an approach offers increasing challenge that is built around common assessment objectives. 

All year groups will study Shakespeare: while the language might offer a common degree of challenge, each text is progressively more challenging in terms of the associated themes and issues addressed as well as the subtlety with which each one is explored.  For example, in Year 7, “The Tempest” focuses on themes related to magic and family, whereas “Macbeth”, in Year 8, deals with more complex ideas such a conflict, deceit and guilt. However, in Year 9 students will not study a single text but a range of extracts across two or three.  Such an approach offers opportunity for students to refine their skills of inference and deduction in examining these texts as well as producing ever more detailed and insightful responses as they move towards a more sophisticated and nuanced understanding of the layers of meaning that are evident within and across texts. 

A similar approach can be seen with the progression of written skills where, in Year 7, students might be required to identify the use of specific literary and linguistic devices and apply them in their own work.  However, in Year 8 and Year 9 the expectations for performance will become more complex and refined.  The terminology will offer greater challenge and will see students master the move from word level to sentence and then whole text level in their written responses with greater independence.  Equally, student application and analysis of such terms will become further refined and require consideration of the appropriate and deliberate crafting of language for specific effect. 

Key Stage 4

At KS4 students pursue Edexcel GCSE qualifications in both English Language and English Literature.

The English Language course is comprised of three units based on topics such as Fiction and Imaginative Writing – a study of and creative response to 19th century literature and Non-fiction and Transactional Writing – a study of and creative response to 20th and 21st century non-fiction texts. These exams test skills on understanding, analysis and evaluation. Equally, students will be examined on their ability to articulate themselves with clarity and sophistication in a structured, deliberate fashion. Both units will be assessed by external examination. Paper 1 is worth 40% of the GCSE and Paper 2 the remaining 60%.

Students will also complete the Spoken Language Endorsement. Although this is a compulsory part of the course it does not carry a weighting. Students will be required to complete a presentation, this can be informative or creative in style, and interact with an audience through question and answer. This will be marked internally and moderated externally. Students will be awarded a pass, merit or distinction.

The English Literature course also comprises two units: Shakespeare and Post-1914 Literature – a study of two texts specified by the exam board. Currently we are studying either “Romeo and Juliet” by William Shakespeare and “An Inspector Calls by JB Priestley. The second unit focuses on a 19th century Novel and Poetry since 1789 – the study of a novel specified by the exam board, currently we study either “The Strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde” by Robert Louis Stevenson or “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens, and the study of poems connected by the theme of Conflict from an anthology. Students will be assessed on their ability to respond critically to texts through analysis and exploration of ideas, themes and other authorial methods. Students will also be required to focus on the social, historical, cultural and political contexts of the time in which texts are written and those in which they are received. Both units will be assessed by external examination and are equally weighted at 50% each.

Language Skills Taught:

A01 Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas Select and synthesise evidence from different texts
A02 Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views
A03 Compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, cross two or more texts A04 Evaluate texts critically and support this with appropriate textual references
A05 Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style, and register for different forms, purposes and audiences. Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts
A06 Candidates must use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation
A07 Demonstrate presentation skills in a formal setting
A08 Listen and respond appropriately to spoken language, including to questions and feedback to presentations
A09 Use spoken Standard English effectively in speeches and presentations

Literature Skills Taught:

A01 Read, understand and respond to texts
A02 Maintain a critical style and develop an informed personal response
A03 Use textual references, including quotations, to support and illustrate interpretations
A04 Analyse the language, form and structure used by a writer to create meanings and effects, using relevant subject terminology where appropriate
A05 Show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written and effects, using relevant subject terminology where appropriate
A06 Use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation.

Specifications:

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-gcses/english-language-2015.html

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-gcses/english-literature-2015.html

Year 10

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3

English Literature Paper 1: Post 1914 Drama

"An Inspector Calls" J B Priestley

English Language Paper 1

19th Century Fiction and Imaginative Writing

English Literature Paper 2: 19th Century Literature

"Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" Robert Louis Stevenson

Term 4 Term 5 Term 6

English Language Paper 2: "Beyond"

20th and 21st Century Non-Fiction and Transactional Writing

English Literature Paper 1:

Shakespeare "Romeo and Juliet"

English Language and Literature Revision

 

Year 11

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3

English Literature Paper 2: Poetry

Conflict Anthology and Unseen

English Language: Revision

English Literature: Revision
Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
English Language and Literature Revision

English Language and Literature Revision

Exams

 

Example of skill progression

Having experienced a broad and full curriculum in Key Stage 3, students will move into Key Stage 4 with confidence having already become familiar with the challenges that GCSE poses such as the study of challenging themes and a range of genres. 

The specific challenge that is offered at this stage is threefold.  First, in the degree of depth and independence that is required of students as they explore set texts for GCSE English Literature.  Second, in the challenge that unseen extracts from 19th Century fiction and 20th and 21st Century non-fiction offer where breadth and range is concerned, and finally, in the way that they will need to apply their understanding of such varied content across common skills through assessment.  For example, while students might be able to analyse and evaluate the specific literary methods that are evident within an extract from Dostoyevsky’s “Crime and Punishment”, it is another challenge altogether to apply these same skills to an obituary of a Jazz singer in the 1920’s. 

Beyond this, students are required to shape their written responses with an exacting consideration of audience, purpose, tone and register in relation to a given, unseen, and often varied written styles such as review, argue, describe and explain.  This builds on Key Stage 3 learning in the way that students must now exhibit greater control and discriminating choices where language is concerned. 

Key Stage 5

At Key Stage 5 Students can study either the English Language/Literature A level or the English Literature A level. 

The English Language/Literature course was designed to ensure the right balance of coverage of the two disciplines; it enables students to see how linguistic and literary methods are related and to explore these links in their work.

Unit 1: Telling stories – The aim of this part of the subject content is to allow students to learn about how and why stories of different kinds are told. The term ‘telling’ in the title is deliberately chosen to reflect the twin aspects of how stories are told, and why stories are ‘telling’, or valuable, within societies.

Unit 2: Exploring conflict - This part of the subject content focuses on how language choices help to construct ideas of conflict between people, and between people and their societies. Students learn about the ways in which writers and speakers use language, beginning with a general focus on broad questions.

Unit 3: NEA: Making Connections - This part of the subject content focuses on language use in different types of text. It is called 'Making Connections' because it requires students to make active connections between a literary text and some non-literary material. The connections must be based either on a chosen theme or on the idea that particular linguistic strategies and features may occur in the different types of material. This area of the course provides an individualised experience for students, enabling them to demonstrate their ability to initiate and sustain independent enquiry.

Assessment Objectives:

AO1: Articulate informed, personal and creative responses to literary texts, using associated concepts and terminology, and coherent, accurate written expression

AO2: Analyse ways in which meanings are shaped in literary texts

AO3: Demonstrate understanding of the significance and influence of the contexts in which literary texts are written and received

AO4: Explore connections across literary texts

AO5: Explore literary texts informed by different interpretations

 

Extra-Curricular Activities/Independent Learning Opportunities:

We place strong emphasis on academic learning beyond the classroom and the prescribed specifications. We expect Sixth Form students to work independently and to take full advantage of the resources that the Library and academic departments provide. The extra-curricular life of Prince William School is varied, from theatre productions and university lectures to visits from authors as well as University visits. All pupils are expected to play a full and active part in the extra-curricular life of the School.

Additionally, the school offers opportunities for students to act as learning mentors for Reading and Literacy with younger students.

Specification

https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/english/specifications/AQA-7716-7717-SP-2015.PDF

Year 12

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3

Language Levels Introductions and skills

Paris anthology - Paper 1

Browning poetry anthology - Paper 1

Paris anthology - Paper 1

Browning poetry anthology - Paper 1

Term 4 Term 5 Term 6

Paris anthology - Paper 1

"Frankenstein" - Paper 1

MOCKS:

"Frankenstein" - Paper 1

Revision of Paper 1 components

NEA Drafting: Investigation "Into the Wild" re-creative writing and commentaries - Paper 2

 

Year 13

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3

"Into the Wild" re-creative writing and commentaries - Paper 2

"A Streetcar Named Desire" - Paper 2

MOCKS: Paper 1 and Paper 2

"Into the Wild" re-creative writing and commentaries - Paper 2

"A Streetcar Named Desire" - Paper 2

Revision of Paper 1 components
Term 4 Term 5 Term 6

MOCKS:

Paper 1 and Paper 2 Revision

Paper 1 and Paper 2 Revision

PAPER 1 A LEVEL EXAM

PAPER 2 A LEVEL EXAM

 

The English Literature course offers students many different learning styles and opportunities to engage with Literature in a very wide variety of contexts, helping them to develop skills in interpretation and analysis through the reading, observation and discussion of texts. The gradual acquisition of experience, of literary and linguistic awareness through independent study, is the process which creates a strong A Level candidate.

Currently, we are transitioning between examination boards for A level English Literature; information for both boards is provided. 

Year 12: Edexcel English Literature

Component 1: Drama Students will get the opportunity to study one Shakespeare play surrounding the theme of tragedy enriched by an anthology of critical essays alongside the study of one other drama text.

Component 2: Prose Students will be able to study two prose texts comparatively focusing on a specific theme.

Component 3: Poetry Students will get the chance to study classic poetry from a specific literary period, or poet, as well as studying a more modern, post 2000 collection of poetry.

NEA: Students will be able to delve into their passion for Literature by writing a 3000 word essay with a focus on two literary texts of their choosing.

Specification:

https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/A%20Level/English%20Literature/2015/Specification%20and%20sample%20assessments/GCE2015-A-level-Eng-Lit-spec-Issue-6.pdf

Year 13: AQA B English Literature

Unit 1: Literary Genres The course offers the option to study tragedy or comedy across three texts to be taken from drama, prose and poetry with additional criteria set to provide focus on texts produced pre-1900.

Unit 2: Texts and Genres The course offers the option to study elements of crime writing or elements of political and social protest writing across three texts; one post-2000 text, one poetry and one further text, one of which must be written pre-1900.  The examination will also include an unseen passage. 

Unit 3: Theory and Independence Includes the study of two texts, one poetry and one prose, informed by the study of the critical anthology to include Feminism, Marxism, Eco-Criticism and Post-Colonial Theory.

Specification:

https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/english/specifications/AQA-7716-7717-SP-2015.PDF

Assessment Objectives

AO1: Articulate informed, personal and creative responses to literary texts, using associated concepts and terminology, and coherent, accurate written expression

AO2: Analyse ways in which meanings are shaped in literary texts

AO3: Demonstrate understanding of the significance and influence of the contexts in which literary texts are written and received

AO4: Explore connections across literary texts

AO5: Explore literary texts informed by different interpretations

Expectations:

We expect our students to become avid readers, to take as much responsibility as possible for their learning and for the development of their cultural awareness. This is a subject in which we can direct you towards key skills and give you a chance to broaden your literary and cultural experience. Wider reading can help students to establish a sense of authority in their responses to any given text.

Extra-Curricular Activities/Independent Learning Opportunities:

We place strong emphasis on academic learning beyond the classroom and the prescribed specifications. We expect Sixth Form students to work independently and to take full advantage of the resources that the Library and academic faculty’s provide. The extra-curricular life of Prince William School is varied, from theatre productions to visits from authors and University visits. All pupils are expected to play a full and active part in the extra-curricular life of the School.                                                

Additionally, the school offers opportunities for students to act as learning mentors for Reading and Literacy with younger students.

Year 12: Edexcel specification

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3

"Othello" - Paper 1

Keats Poetry - Paper 3

"Othello" - Paper 1

Keats Poetry - Paper 3

“A Streetcar Named Desire” – Paper 1

Post 2000 Poetry – Paper 3

Term 4 Term 5 Term 6

“A Streetcar Named Desire” – Paper 1

Post 2000 Poetry – Paper 3

MOCKS:

Revision of Paper 1&3 Components

NEA Planning and Drafting

Year 13: AQA B Specification 

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3

"The Handmaids Tale" - Paper 2

"The Kite Runner" - Paper 2

MOCKS:

"The Handmaids Tale" - Paper 2

"The Kite Runner" - Paper 2

Blake Poetry - Paper 2

Blake Poetry & Unseen - Paper 2

Term 4 Term 5 Term 6

MOCKS:

Blake Poetry – Paper 2

Revision of Paper 1 Components

Paper 1 and Paper 2 Revision

PAPER 1 A LEVEL EXAM

PAPER 1 A LEVEL EXAM

 

 

 

Example of skill progression

The progression seen as students make the choice to move into Key Stage 5 can be seen on two levels.  The first, and perhaps most immediately noticeable, is the breadth and challenge offered by the texts studied.  This is both in terms of the sophistication of the written text itself as well as the issues addressed.  Such challenge often pushes students beyond their current level of understanding, not just of the taught content but the world beyond their direct studies.  For example, in studying Margaret Atwood’s novel “The Handmaid’s Tale” students are asked to consider issues such as conspiracy, control and corruption within the fictional and speculative representation of the world that Atwood has crafted.  And in studying “Into the Wild”, Jon Krakauer’s tale of Chris McCandless’ misadventures throughout North America, students must confront concepts such as truth, risk and rebellion. Not only this but students will be required to build this same intensity of study across a range of texts by the same author, such as John Keats or Robert Browning, and in so doing, make multi layered judgements and more erudite connections than previously expected. 

Further to this, and beyond the challenge offered by the texts studied, is the expectation that, in order to meet the very highest levels of attainment, students will refine their skills in building argument and debate, in challenging perspectives, in the cohesion of ideas and the critical approach they take to those texts.

 

Careers and progression

Qualification pathways 

The department has responded to student requirements by offering both English Literature A level and English Language/Literature A level.

The GCSE offered at KS4 prepares students perfectly for either English Literature of English Language/Literature A level offered at KS5, which in turn prepares students for further study at degree or employment in related sector. 

Careers that relate directly to the study of English include:

Digital Copywriter; Editorial Assistant; English as a Foreign Language Teacher; Lexicographer; Magazine Journalist; Newspaper Journalist; Primary School Teacher; Secondary School Teacher; Writer.

Careers where the study of English would be useful include:

Academic Librarian; Advertising Account Executive; Advertising Copywriter; Arts Administrator; Information Officer; Marketing Executive; Public Relations Officer; Records Manager.

Good combinations of other subject to study with English are:

History, Religious Education, Art, Psychology, Sociology, French/Spanish, English Literature.

 

Example of successful progressions

3 students from Y13 progressed to higher education/careers in an English related area in 2019.

 

Examples of links to Gatsby benchmark 4 (Linking curriculum to careers) 

  • Case studies of professional authors; investigation, research, interpretation and review. 
  • Schemes of work focused on transactional writing to include, amongst others, job applications and cover letters. 
  • Schemes of work focused on moving “Beyond” their current sphere of understanding to explore topics such as further study, aspirational careers and exceptional performance. 
  • Participation in projects with Oundle School such as “Balloon Debate” and Post 16 students acting as judges in a creative writing competition across local Primary Schools. 
  • Participation in writing competitions with Young Writers with many successful entries having been published.
  • Participation, and great success, in the Queen Mother’s Handwriting Competition. 

 

Examples of link to Gatsby benchmark 5 (encounters with employers)

  • Educational visit to see performances of Shakespeare’s ”Othello”, Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire”, J B Priestley’s “An Inspector Calls”, Miller’s “Death of a Salesman” and visits to the British Museum and the British Library.
  • Talk from Benjamin Zephaniah, former Children’s Poet Laureate, social rights campaigner, poet and playwright. 
  • Talk Tamsin Winter, local teacher turned novelist and Carnegie Medal nominee. 

 

Employability skills

SPAG, essay construction, purpose & audience, comprehension, interpreting, vocabulary, articulation, debate, argue, support, inform, justify.

 

Student Testimonials:

“I really enjoy English Literature, it fits in well with my other subjects that I study and encourages me to think in an analytical way.” 

“I loved A Level English Language and Literature because it was so much more challenging than the GCSE course and offered a totally new approach that was exciting and unexpected.  It opened up a lot of new doors that I hadn’t even realised existed.”

“I enjoy the wide range of texts we study at A Level. I believe that my strengths lie in analysing and applying context to the text as well as finding alternate approaches and criticism.”

Subject Documents Date  
KS3 Revision Material 19th Sep 2019 Download
KS4 Revision Guides 19th Sep 2019 Download
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